Progesterone release and incidence of bacteria following disinfection and reuse of controlled internal drug release devices (CIDRs)

  • B. Talsma Tarleton State University, Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
  • B. J. Fields Tarleton State University, Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
  • K. L. Vincent Tarleton State University, Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
  • W. B. Smith Tarleton State University, Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
  • J. L. Speshock Tarleton State University, Department of Biological Sciences, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
  • J. Waddell Department of Animal and Poultry Science, 175 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061
  • D. Snyder Tarleton State University, Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
  • N. W. Dias Department of Animal and Poultry Science, 175 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061
  • V. R. G. Mercadante Department of Animal and Poultry Science, 175 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061
  • T. Jones Tarleton State University, Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
  • D. A. Roper Tarleton State University, Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology, 1333 West Washington, Stephenville, TX 76402
Keywords: progesterone, bacteria, reuse, CIDR

Abstract

Controlled internal drug release (CIDR) devices have been reused in cattle estrous synchronization protocols. However, the effectiveness of the CIDR and incidence of vaginal bacteria secondary to reuse remains unclear. Therefore, 2 experiments were conducted to evaluate plasma progesterone and vaginal bacteria utilizing used CIDRs disinfected prior to reuse. In Exp. 1, cows received a new CIDR (CONT) or a used CIDR disinfected by 1 of 3 methods: autoclaved (AUTO), dishwasher (DISH), or chlorhexidine (CHLO). No difference was detected in plasma progesterone (P = 0.24) concentration between treatment groups. Daily progesterone concentrations differed during CIDR treatment (P < 0.001) on d 0, 3, and 7. In Exp. 2, vaginal mucous samples were collected pre- and post-synchronization. Cows received CONT, AUTO, or CHLO treated CIDRs. Bacterial loads in vaginal mucus cultured on TSA blood agar did not differ by treatment (P = 0.29) nor by day (P = 0.69). CHLO-treated CIDRs had higher bacterial gram-negative colony counts than those disinfected with AUTO or CONT (P = 0.0035), and bacterial load was higher on d 7 than d 0 (P = 0.0025) for vaginal mucous samples cultured on EMB agar. Based on the results of these studies, twice-used treated CIDRs do not reduce progesterone plasma concentrations, however, risk of bacterial contamination of the vagina must be considered.

Published
2020-06-01
How to Cite
Talsma, B., Fields, B. J., Vincent, K. L., Smith, W. B., Speshock, J. L., Waddell, J., Snyder, D., Dias, N. W., Mercadante, V. R. G., Jones, T., & Roper, D. A. (2020). Progesterone release and incidence of bacteria following disinfection and reuse of controlled internal drug release devices (CIDRs). The Bovine Practitioner, 54(2), 130-135. Retrieved from https://bovine-ojs-tamu.tdl.org/bovine/index.php/bovine/article/view/8026
Section
Articles